Birth Parents

Considering placing your child for adoption?

Birth parents who choose to place a child for adoption do so for many reasons. Sometimes they feel they’re still too young to be parents, they don’t have the time or resources to devote to a child, or they’re not financially stable enough. These are all legitimate reasons. When a birth parent makes the selfless decision to place a child for adoption, he or she has concluded that adoption will be in the child’s best interests.

If you are a birth parent considering placing your child (born or unborn) for adoption, you should know your rights and your options before making a decision. In Florida, you can review your rights by going to the Florida Statutes website. You can view my Adoption Disclosure here.

If you are a birth mother placing your child for adoption, and are unable to meet your reasonable and necessary living expenses, or medical expenses, in relation to your pregnancy, you may be able to receive to up to $5,000 for such expenses incurred up to six weeks after the baby is born.

A birth mother placing her child for adoption may also be entitled to a pre-paid consultation with an attorney of her choosing, as well as any counseling or therapy, in connection with the decision to place the child for adoption. While birth fathers cannot receive reasonable and necessary living expenses and medical expenses related to the pregnancy, they may have access to pre-paid counseling and a legal consultation related to the adoption.

Receiving reasonable and necessary living expenses, medical expenses, consultation with an attorney, and/or counseling, does not obligate a birth parent to place his or her child for adoption.*

If you are considering placing your child for adoption, please feel free to review the Prospective Parents page on this website. If you find a suitable parent or parents on that page, please contact Melissa A. Tartaglia, Esq., who will arrange for you to meet with an attorney of your own choosing, and/or counseling, to help you understand your rights, and to feel comfortable with whatever decision you make. Please know, however, that Melissa A. Tartaglia represents the legal interests of the prospective adoptive parents, and cannot give you, the birth parent, legal advice.

*If your child is under six months of age, once you sign a Consent and Waiver by Parent, it is irrevocable. If your child is six months of age or older, the Consent and Waiver by Parent is irrevocable after three business days. An Affidavit of Non-Paternity is irrevocable from the moment it is signed, regardless of the child’s age, unless it was signed under fraud or duress. You can review a standard Consent and Waiver by Parent here.